$20M by Earth Day 2020 to Remove Explosive Remnants of Vietnam’s War-Ridden Past

June 21, 2018–Aspen/Snowmass, Colorado–Over 160 of the world’s leading minds and innovators gathered at AREDAY to tackle solutions for the world’s most pressing issues. Global leaders such as Claes Nobel, Sylvia Earl, Jean-Michel Cousteau, General Wesley Clark, Reverend Gerald Durley, and other visionaries discussed the challenges of humanity and life on Earth with the theme Whole System Solutions to Climate Change with a sense of urgency to implement, accelerate and replicate projects.

Roots of Peace, a humanitarian non-profit, responded to this global call to action by forming a new collaboration with United Earth, NSHSS and Projects for Good to solve the landmine crisis that plagues the Earth, as it prevents farmers from cultivating fields and endangers wildlife.

“Climate change results in increased rainfall or tsunamis, then mudslides create a nightmare, when they move mines or other unexploded remnants of war, making them even more difficult to find and remove. Millions of trees must be planted on former minefields to create carbon dioxide for our planet to breathe,” stated Heidi Kuhn, CEO, Roots of Peace.

The consortium will focus their initial efforts on Quang Tri province, the former DMZ, Vietnam where millions of landmines, UXO and cluster munitions prevent rural farmers from cultivating their fields. Since The Vietnam War ended on April 30, 1975, more than 100,000 innocent Vietnamese have been maimed or killed by remnants of war. The clear vision is to to remove all explosive remnants of war by Earth Day 2020  and plant fresh black pepper trees on former battlefields. That will cost an estimated $20 million.

Over 23,000 high school students in 170 countries working with NSHSS will join this effort to raise both awareness and funds for Quang Tri, Vietnam. Children helping children to walk the Earth without fear. “We will walk hand in hand, and heart to heart, with no division anymore as we plant the roots of peace”,’ stated Claes Nobel. With access to resources and a network of over 1.4 million exceptional peers, these students embody the ‘Nobel Spirit’ as we will demonstrate clear results in Vietnam to demine, replant and rebuild war-torn communities.”

Projects for Good, an innovative Silicon Valley company, joins this effort by providing an online place to create partnerships which will impact Vietnam. “Projects for Good is proud to partner with Roots of Peace as we turn MINES TO VINES–replacing minefields with pepper vines in the former battlefields of Quang Tri,” stated Patrick Furlotti, CEO, “We empower communities with an easy way to raise funds and complete projects through online community resources, knowledge sharing and tangible resources which will demonstrate impact.”

For further information, please visit www.rootsofpeace.org   www.nshss.hk  www.projectsforgood.com